Cargill Abandons Appeal of Court Ruling Protecting Redwood City Salt Ponds

Photo of Cargill salt ponds by Craig Howell

Great news — we officially won our lawsuit over the Cargill salt ponds in Redwood City! Last week, Cargill withdrew their appeal of the district court’s ruling that the Cargill salt ponds are subject to the Clean Water Act. With the federal government having already dropped their own appeal, this puts an end to the Trump administration’s misguided attempt to subvert federal environmental laws.

Thank you for standing with us as we took on the Trump Administration and Cargill in the courts and on the ground to protect our threatened and beloved Bay shoreline and restore the salt ponds back to wetlands for the benefit of people and wildlife. 

Please help us continue the fight for our Bay shoreline with a monthly donation of $6 today.

Trump Administration’s Attack On Restorable Wetlands

In 2019, the Trump administration declared that the Cargill salt ponds were not subject to the Clean Water Act — going against the facts, the law, and the findings of Environmental Protection Agency staff. Together with our co-plaintiffs Baykeeper, Citizens Committee to Complete the Refuge, and Save the Bay — and represented by Cotchett, Pitre, and McCarthy LLP — we filed suit against the Trump administration challenging this decision as unlawful.

Victory In Our Lawsuit Against Trump Administration

In October 2020, Judge William Alsup with the Northern District of California ruled that because the Cargill salt ponds are connected to the Bay, they are in fact subject to the Clean Water Act. The Trump administration filed an appeal of this decision in December 2020, but that appeal was dismissed by the Biden administration this February. Now, Cargill has dismissed their appeal as well, signalling that they are finally accepting the reality that the salt ponds are in fact part of the waters of the United States.

Cargill Should Sell the Salt Ponds for Conservation

It’s time for Cargill to abandon its misguided plans to build a massive development on the salt ponds. Cargill’s earlier development proposal, for a city-sized development of 12,000 housing units and over 1 million square feet of office, was met with such universal opposition from residents and environmental organizations that they withdrew their proposal in 2012. Nevertheless, Cargill has continued to threaten new plans for development on the salt ponds.

The Cargill salt ponds are simply the wrong place for development. Not only is this restorable wetland uniquely valuable as habitat and sea level rise protection, but it would be a terrible location for housing — it’s right across the street from heavy industry, it’s far away from transit centers, and it’s vulnerable to flooding and sea level rise.

We’re calling on Cargill to finally see the light and recognize that the salt ponds should be restored to wetlands and preserved as open space in their entirety.

The Green Foothills community helped to make this win possible, thank you for standing with us as we fight for the Bay, climate resilience, and biodiversity throughout our region.

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